Wireless network connection says validating identity

“There’s more than one way to do it.” I’ve been working with Asterisk for nine years, and this motto becomes more true with each release, each added feature, and each clever person who attacks a telecommunications problem with this incredibly flexible toolkit. Then, I typically point the person toward the first edition of this book, , and set him loose.

I had the fantastic opportunity to work as the community manager for the Asterisk project at Digium for two years, which gave me one of the best vantage points for seeing the scope and imagination of the worldwide development effort pushing Asterisk forward. In just a few hours of development (or longer, of course), companies can change the way they deliver products to customers, nonprofits can overhaul how their users interact with the services they offer, and individuals can learn to build a perfectly customized call-handling system for their mobile and home phones.

For those of you building the most complex installations, there is even more interesting work—which will be realized quite soon—in development.

I see Asterisk making deep inroads into the financial, military, hospital, Fortune 100 enterprise, service provider, calling card, and mobile environments. From the basic beginnings of a PBX that Mark Spencer coded in 1999, the Asterisk project, with the help of thousands of developers, has moved from simply connecting phone calls and has matured into a platform that can handle voice, video, and text across dozens of virtual and physical interface types.

This book will take you from a vague idea of doing something with computers and voice communication to the point where you’re able to stun everyone you know with your phone system’s sophisticated tricks.

You’re encouraged to participate in the online mailing lists, IRC chatrooms, and yearly Astri Con conference that provide up-to-the-second news and discussion surrounding the project.

Without your interest, input, and code, Asterisk wouldn’t exist.

Open source projects are hungry for new ideas and excellent contributions: I encourage you to be a participant in the Asterisk community, and I look forward to seeing your questions and examples in the next edition of this book. Asterisk is an open source, converged telephony platform, which is designed primarily to run on Linux.

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